amaBhungane

Toilet saga still smells

By Jackie Mapiloko During school holidays my parents would ship me to a relative’s house in Evaton, a tiny settlement in the Vaal Triangle. My ageing relative was landlord to about 20 families who lived in shacks in a yard, which she had inherited from her mother. As the landlord, or ”ma-stand” as she was…

16 Comments Continue Reading →

The media needs a hug

By Ilham Rawoot Writing a good investigative story is hard work. It’s not a matter of sitting down at a computer and typing away. It takes a lot of time, talking to many sources, going through documents, research and asking questions to people implicated or involved. This includes putting allegations to people and getting a…

10 Comments Continue Reading →

Warning: Too much openness can be hazardous to your health

By Sam Sole So. Thanks to the Financial Mail we now know that the outcry over the Protection of Information Bill is an “overreaction” from people “obsessed” with openness and the availability of information. Chillingly that is the view of the man tasked with ushering this dangerous piece of legislation through parliament, the honourable Cecil…

22 Comments Continue Reading →

Our small part in Selebi’s downfall

By Stefaans Brümmer I take no pleasure in seeing a man go down, stripped of his dignity, exposed for his lies. That sense is more acute in the case of Jackie Selebi, convicted of corruption on Friday. For Selebi’s story is in many ways a parable of our democracy: it is a story of struggle,…

32 Comments Continue Reading →

Football over power!

By Gcina Ntsaluba The World Cup might be running like a well-oiled machine on the surface but behind the closed doors of the Local Organising Committee offices, a “war” is brewing. Conspiracy theories of a possible coup d’état on chief organiser Danny Jordaan by his deputy, Irvin Khoza, have been going around, and according to…

7 Comments Continue Reading →

Fifa: Time for a coup?

By Adriaan Basson Who owns the sea? (BP might think they do, but no.) And street cricket? And climbing up Table Mountain? Horse racing? And walking your dog? So why do we allow Fifa to continue behaving as if they own the beautiful game? Why should I be forced to pay R30 for one reddish…

23 Comments Continue Reading →

The story that almost changed my life

By Jackie Mapiloko For the last two months I’ve been working on a story that was going to change my life. It should have been published weeks ago, but I remember saying to my boss: “There’s something missing, I need more time.” If this story’s aim was to make every humanitarians stomach turn with anger,…

18 Comments Continue Reading →

This is why we write about strip clubs

By Ilham Rawoot Some readers seem to have gotten the wrong idea about Amabhungane’s coverage of the strip-club industry — coverage that we plan to continue. Some comments are that I, as the writer, am a prude, that I am against the decriminalisation of prostitution, and that what I am writing about in this regard…

22 Comments Continue Reading →

The World Cup’s two faces

By Gcina Ntsaluba Cape Town was a bit of a buzz this week with celebrations to mark the 30-day countdown to the kick-off of the 2010 Fifa World Cup. Even the mayor, Dan Plato, showed up at the celebrations to share the spotlight with local artists, including JR of “make da circle bigger” fame to…

23 Comments Continue Reading →

Our government idolises crime

By Jackie Mapiloko Just over a week ago I woke up to the news that my brother and his wife were shot in their home. Three bullets went through his spine and his wife was hit in the neck and stomach. He will never walk again. She is still in intensive care and can’t remember…

38 Comments Continue Reading →