Mandela Rhodes Scholars

Prof Gerwel believed in me…

Edited and compiled by Suntosh Pillay Many sterling tributes and obituaries have already been written, drawn, spoken and reminisced for the late Professor Jakes Gerwel. In addition to his many other roles he served as chairperson of the board of trustees of the Mandela Rhodes Foundation (MRF), which annually selects the Mandela Rhodes Scholars. Some…

Leave a comment Continue Reading →

Where the textbook teachers?

By Athambile Masola I’ve been following the Limpopo textbook saga with half an ear. The furore unfolded while my learners and I were undergoing the arduous and exhausting process of mid-year exams. The debacle has been yet another crude reminder of the compromise of a constitutional right as well as the incompetence of the department…

17 Comments Continue Reading →

ANC lives and leads: A burning reminder

By Petunia Mpoza I wake up to the beep of my phone, signalling messages from friends and comrades alike, ensuring departure centres and time. It is at this moment that I realise that it is more than simply individuals from all walks of life who congregate in African National Congress regalia. It is not simply…

23 Comments Continue Reading →

South Africa as a democratic developmental state: Bureaucratically not there yet

By Elnari Potgieter As part of the 2011 State of the Nation address, President Zuma claimed, “Our goal is clear. We want to have a country…where the quality of life is high.” His statement ties in with the South African government’s vision of constructing South Africa as a developmental state, which frames the agenda for…

9 Comments Continue Reading →

Social transformation: we don’t need permission

This post is in response to the recent Community of Mandela Rhodes Scholars (CMRS) “Conversations for Change” sessions held throughout the country in May. As a platform for constructive interdisciplinary debate and intellectual enquiry, the sessions sought to bring together academic institutions, public intellectuals, social activists, students, and community members with the intention of facilitating…

3 Comments Continue Reading →

Believing is seeing: Setting improbable goals as a means to social transformation

This post is in response to the recent Community of Mandela Rhodes Scholars (CMRS) “Conversations for Change” sessions held throughout the country in May. As a platform for constructive interdisciplinary debate and intellectual enquiry, the sessions sought to bring together academic institutions, public intellectuals, social activists, students, and community members with the intention of facilitating…

8 Comments Continue Reading →

Do we need Africa Day?

This post is in response to the recent Community of Mandela Rhodes Scholars (CMRS) “Conversations for Change” sessions held throughout the country in May. As a platform for constructive interdisciplinary debate and intellectual enquiry, the sessions sought to bring together academic institutions, public intellectuals, social activists, students, and community members with the intention of facilitating…

5 Comments Continue Reading →

“A better life for all”: The case for a youth wage subsidy

By Matthew de la Hey The South African unemployment rate is currently 25.2%. This means that 4.5-million people who had sought employment within the four weeks preceding the reference week were unable to find a job. This figure rises to 38% if those who have given up hope and have stopped looking — the “discouraged…

99 Comments Continue Reading →

Distractions, decoys and the South African dream

By Andrew Ihsaan Gasnolar I am troubled by the machinations that I am subjected to on a daily basis by the ruling elite. This is not uniquely South African but rather it is the game that those in power seek to play in order to confuse, delay and complicate our lives. I guess this cataclysmic…

10 Comments Continue Reading →

The deeper purposes of education

By Mario Meyer I have a family member, a cousin pursuing a BCom accounting degree, who regularly derides the (economic) value of a BA degree. My cousin subscribes to the view that the purpose of education is primarily to equip people with the necessary productive skills and competencies to, at least theoretically, access and enter…

7 Comments Continue Reading →