Danielle Nierenberg

Sustainable fishing

Global fish production has reached an all-time high, according to Nourishing the Planet’s latest research for the Worldwatch Institute’s Vital Signs Online publication. Aquaculture, or fish farming — once a minor contributor to total fish harvest — increased 50-fold between the 1950s and 2008 and now contributes nearly half of all fish produced worldwide.According to…

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Getting more crop per drop

Increasing demand for water continues to put a strain on available water sources, threatening the livelihood of millions of small-scale farmers who depend on water for their crops. At a time when one in eight people lack access to safe water, Nourishing the Planet points to low-cost, small-scale innovations to better manage this vital resource….

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Agriculture: The unlikely Earth Day hero

Cross-posted from the Worldwatch Institute’s Nourishing the Planet. For over 40 years, Earth Day has served as a call to action, mobilising individuals and organisations around the world to address these challenges. This year Nourishing the Planet highlights agriculture—often blamed as a driver of environmental problems—as an emerging solution. Agriculture is a source of food…

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Celebrating biodiversity

By Danielle Nierenberg & Amanda Stone   The year 2010 was declared the International Year of Biodiversity by the United Nations and not surprisingly, the focus lay mainly on the usual species the public recognizes and adores, without addressing the bigger issues. It isn’t only pandas and rainforests that need protecting. There are also thousands…

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Where cultivation meets conflict

Part I: Farming in Sudan’s war-torn Darfur region Producing enough food to satisfy domestic markets is a challenge that countries throughout sub-Saharan Africa face. But for places in Africa where conflict and war prevail, the threat of hunger and malnutrition is particularly acute. For many, the biggest obstacle is accessibility, as internal conflict often limits…

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When two elephants fight, it’s the grass that suffers

By Danielle Nierenberg and Abby Massey “When two elephants fight, it’s the grass that suffers,” says Gertrude Hambira, Secretary General of the General Agriculture Plantation Workers Union of Zimbabwe (GAPWUZ), describing the state of her country since elections two years ago. The elephants in this case are Zimbabwe’s two leaders, Robert Mugabe and Morgan Tsvangirai,…

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Thinking big by starting small

Originally featured in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer on June 30, 2010 and written by Danielle Nierenberg, Molly Theobald and Stephanie Hanson. It’s easy to feel overwhelmed by the fact that 1 billion people worldwide are going to bed hungry every night. And, in the United States, it is easy to look at sub-Saharan Africa — where the…

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Working with the Root

The following is an eight-part series about Danielle Nierenberg’s visit to the Ecumenical Association for Sustainable Agriculture and Rural Development’s (ECASARD) work in Ghana. Cross posted from Worldwatch Institute’s Nourishing the Planet. Part I: Working with the Root The Ecumenical Association for Sustainable Agriculture and Rural Development (ECASARD), based in Accra, Ghana, is a unique…

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Innovative Ways of Hearing Farmers’ Voices

This is a three part series about Danielle Nierenberg’s visit to the Food, Agriculture, and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network in Pretoria, South Africa. Cross posted from Worldwatch Institute’s Nourishing the Planet. Part I: Working to connect farmers, researchers, and policy makers in Africa The Food, Agriculture, and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN) lives…

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The peanut butter model

It’s not every day you meet someone from Raleigh while travelling in Lusaka, Zambia. Dale Lewis might not have intended to spend decades in the landlocked African country of 12 million, but his passion for protecting wildlife and for conservation led him there — and his entrepreneurial spirit and desire to lift farmers from poverty while…

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