Mandela Rhodes Scholars

Distractions, decoys and the South African dream

By Andrew Ihsaan Gasnolar I am troubled by the machinations that I am subjected to on a daily basis by the ruling elite. This is not uniquely South African but rather it is the game that those in power seek to play in order to confuse, delay and complicate our lives. I guess this cataclysmic…

10 Comments Continue Reading →

The deeper purposes of education

By Mario Meyer I have a family member, a cousin pursuing a BCom accounting degree, who regularly derides the (economic) value of a BA degree. My cousin subscribes to the view that the purpose of education is primarily to equip people with the necessary productive skills and competencies to, at least theoretically, access and enter…

7 Comments Continue Reading →

You used to be cool

By Mark John Burke Owen is a good friend from my childhood, school and, even later, university years. We had very much the same interest when it came to girls, subjects choices, future dreams and, most importantly, American comedy. At a certain stage this fondness of cheap entertainment included a sitcom of the animated yellow-coloured…

7 Comments Continue Reading →

UKZN crisis – a letter to management

As has been reported in several media sources, the University of KwaZulu Natal (UKZN) faces another crisis, several contract staff members have not been paid for up to four months of work. Many of those who have been paid have not been paid in full. UKZN management has consistently denied or downplayed the issue, as…

22 Comments Continue Reading →

Sex for sale: The state as pimp

By Zuki Mqolomba Debates on adult prostitution have been raging on in South Africa’s public and legal domains since the 1990s. Debates surfaced in 2007 when Labour Court judge Halton Cheadle ruled on the “Kylie” vs Michelle van Zyl case. The debates spiraled once again in light of the foregone 2010 Fifa World Cup, with…

6 Comments Continue Reading →

Apartheid nostalgia, education and agency

By Athambile Masola The media coverage about the shambolic state of education in South Africa (with a recent focus on the Eastern Cape) is disturbing. The views vacillate between inspiring hope for change and declaring doom over the future of the thousands of young people whose right to basic education is being flouted in the…

12 Comments Continue Reading →

Do schools kill creativity?

By Athambile Masola As a new teacher, I have a vested interest in education and I’m always wondering about how to be innovative. I recently had a SMART Board and a data projector installed in my classroom. I was astonished as my learners entered the classroom agog, declaring, “Ma’am your classroom’s been pimped … upgraded!”…

19 Comments Continue Reading →

An industrial revolution for whom?

By Alex Lenferna As a person who is going to live quite a bit longer than President Zuma, (or so I hope, although perhaps six wives supported by the state is the key to longevity) the State of the Nation address (SONA) was worrying. Not only did Zuma spark a rather ironic note by swearing…

36 Comments Continue Reading →

What is the purpose of our education?

By Mario Meyer Tony Blair once said: “Ask me my three main priorities for government, and I tell you: education, education and education.” It is well documented that the South African education system at large, and its primary and secondary public schooling system in particular, is in a state of chronic crises. A large majority…

17 Comments Continue Reading →

Language and inequalities in education

By Athambile Masola As a language teacher, I have been following the furore about African languages being axed from schools with great interest. I have been reading and trying not to be cynical about every new article announcing that yet another school will no longer offer isiZulu or isiXhosa in the foundation phase. There have…

53 Comments Continue Reading →
Page 9« First...8910...20...