Psychological Society of South Africa

Do we still need an International Day Against Homophobia, Transphobia and Biphobia?

By Pierre Brouard Do we still need an International Day Against Homophobia, Transphobia and Biphobia (IDAHOT), to draw attention to the violence and discrimination experienced by lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex people and all other people with diverse sexual orientations, gender identities or expressions, and sex characteristics? If this year’s events I attended are…

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The first rule of large group awareness trainings…

By John Hunter, Ph.D If you have ever been invited by an enthusiastic family member, friend, or work colleague to attend the graduation of a seminar that “transformed” their life, but they refused to provide details about what actually took place in this seminar, then you were probably being invited to a large group awareness…

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An open critique of the Nieuwoudt et al (2019) study on coloured women

By the Division for Research & Methodology (DRM) The Psychological Society of South Africa’s (PsySSA) Division for Research and Methodology (DRM) is committed to the teaching, practice and promotion of relevant, appropriate and ethical scientific research in South Africa. We are disturbed by and strongly opposed to the practice of misusing racial classification in scientific…

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Creating space to talk about the politics of shame

By Rebecca Helman and Neziswa Titi In their interview with Elspeth Probyn, Vivienne Bozalek, Tamara Shefer and Ronelle Carolissen argue that “[s]hame has typically been understood as a negative emotion, a view which is prevalent in individualist, psychologising discourses about human experience”. Conversely Probyn argues that shame can be a generative force, one which is…

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Reattributing shame as an act of social justice

By Rebecca Helman I remember the first time I gave a talk to a group of strangers about that fact that I had been raped. The shame of it felt like a weight, trying to crush me into the floor as I attempted to stand up tall and look unblinkingly out into the room. In…

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An open statement supporting Caster Semenya’s human rights and dignity

It is with great concern that the Sexuality and Gender Division (SGD) of the Psychological Society of South Africa (PsySSA) has been following Caster Semenya’s¹ quest to compete in international athletics. The International Association of Athletics Federation (IAAF) is proposing a new ruling to set a limit on female athletes’ testosterone levels in certain track…

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The Depo-Testosterone stock out must never repeat itself

By Chris/tine McLachlan It was with great concern that the Sexuality and Gender Division (SGD) of the Psychological Society of South Africa (PsySSA) became aware of the shortage of Depo Testosterone in South Africa during the period December 2018 till mid-March 2019, resulting in trans masculine persons / trans men being unable to access their…

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Reflections of an intern psychologist burning out in a public hospital

By Jordan du Toit There was a strike at Bara yesterday. Someone from Soweto came to watch and said, “Ask anybody here in Soweto and they will tell you they don’t want to go to Bara because they might come back in a coffin”. I couldn’t go to the protest. I was literally too busy…

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‘Ubuhle bendoda, izinkomozakhe’ and the trouble with paying lobolo

By Refiloe Makama “Men are never ugly”. Nnu Ego makes this statement in Buchi Emecheta’s novel, The Joys of Motherhood, set during the colonial period in Nigeria. In a scene between two friends, the protagonist Nnu Ego had recently lost her first child, and Ato, her childhood friend comes to comfort her. In a memorable moment,…

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Being Cuban and black in post-apartheid South Africa

By Sol Maria Fernandez Knight Growing up, my mother always told me that I was a special child. But then again many parents want their children to feel unique and valuable, to instill a sense of pride in their identity, and to remind them of their heritage. As a child I did not think how being…

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