Claudia Hirtenfelder
Claudia Hirtenfelder

Xenophobia: We are a fickle bunch

We are a fickle bunch.

 

It amazes me how quickly a group of people can forget what it feels like to be the recipient of hatred. I’m baffled by how once the victim of violence because of an unreasonable reduction in identity can flip and do exactly the same thing.

 

How quickly those who were once the targets of anti-Semitism become the perpetrators of hate crimes against another people.

 

How quickly those who were the recipients of ethnic violence become those willing to torch homosexuals and violate their freedoms.

 

How quickly those who were and continue to be the sufferers of institutional racism turn to xenophobia, Afrophobia and appalling violence.

 

How quickly we forget how being reduced to something (whether it be race, gender, nationality, or religion) alienated us, made us vulnerable and was unfounded.

 

I’m saddened and dumbfounded that we do not make the links, that we do not recognise the hypocrisy, and that we fail to take our anger to the leaders who have failed to curb the frustration.

 

We are a fickle bunch.

Tags: , ,

  • The present ‘world dis-order’
  • The craving for power
  • The resilience of a Somali community in Joburg
  • Beyond Trevor Noah and Mandela’s rainbow: Towards a politics of empathy
    • MKINGAMA KAPINGA

      It also amazes me to note how quickly those fellows are forgetting that they were refugees in camps hosted by countries where those they are killing come from

    • Policat

      The history of the human race is riddled with xenophobia attacks, pogrom’s against other religious or ethnic groups and genocides against other cultures and races in our woeful quest to dominate each other whether it be for resources, or purely for greed and power.
      So fixated are we on finding enemies that the majority of international research funding is directed at finding more efficient ways of killing each other. Wow! We can now obliterate entire countries with the push of a few buttons from thousands of kilometres away.
      Fickle yes,but maybe a symptom of the deeper imperfections of human nature that has not evolved sufficiently to cope with its imaginative brain.