Media

Mourning the death of a legendary white African journalist

It was with deep regret that some of us learnt of the passing on of legendary African journalist Patrick Laurence. Obituaries were carried in the Mail & Guardian and Sunday Times recently. For over 50 years, Laurence was a passionate and committed political writer whose life and work made a clear distinction between radical African…

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Why I like movies about losers

I like movies about losers. Not depressing movies about social issues, you understand – not movies that make you want to slit your wrists because my God the world is a miserable place with precious little opportunity for redemption. No, I mean wry, funny movies about lovable losers whose failures point to the fundamental unfairness…

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Lessons from the News of the World scandal

It would be the ultimate irony if the phone-hacking scandal in the United Kingdom that led to the sinking of the News of the World dragged press freedom down with it. The signs are not encouraging. It has been forecast that the scandal will probably see the demise of the UK press self-regulatory body, the…

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Walmart and South Africa’s misplaced inadequacy

I think South Africa has a small touch of an inferiority complex. An amazing country, with so much potential, but you just don’t always know it.  At least I’m assuming this to be the reason why business leaders, government and excited shoppers have rolled over and prepared for a “corrective” rape from one of the…

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For the Sunday Times, transparency should be the new credibility

It was only after Business Day published, that the Sunday Times proffered an editorial comment – feebly asking the public to feel free to complain about any perceived problems.

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Editors pursue profits, not truth

Editorial leadership and management in the print media have, largely, become corporatised. It is not a new development. Most editors, senior journalists and commentators put on suits, white or colourful shirts and ties when they go to work. Much as there is absolutely nothing wrong with their dress sense or style, it signifies and confirms…

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Polishing turds won’t save our papers

Circulation of English language broadsheets in South Africa is largely in decline. We all know that. But the response hasn’t been to invest in better content. Instead, staff numbers have been slashed, news from elsewhere gets regurgitated and a fixation with other media — websites, multimedia and, of course, Twitter — has developed. Most of…

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Celebrating the Consumer Act

It’s taken me a little while, but I’m truly starting to understand and revel in the full implications of the Consumer Protection Act brought into effect in March this year. The introduction of the CPA, along with some personal experiences in the first half of this year have certainly fuelled the fire of my desire…

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Hell is everywhere in the US

“War … is hell,” observed a famous US soldier, William Tecumseh Sherman, in 1879. If there is any truth in Sherman’s observation, the US seems to be descending into a hell of its own making. The signs and symbols appear everywhere; from the streets of towns and cities, to the schools and on television. One…

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African youth 2.0

By Jacqueline Muna Musiitwa It’s a scary time to be a leader of a country, especially a country in which youth (“youth” defined by the African Youth Charter as those aged 15 to 35) issues are not adequately being addressed. With the uprisings in North Africa and the Middle East, some leaders must stay awake…

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