Avishkar Govender
Avishkar Govender

It is time

The time, in the brief recent history of our country, has come for our country to wade into a foreign conflict, choose a side and fight, using our military, for that side. The time has come for our foreign policy to match our constitutional values, rather than the conflicted and corrupt, reflexive “Friends With All” approach that defines the ANC government’s foreign policy.

All over the world, theatres of war present this opportunity, for countries like ours, to define their own politics, without being dragged into tolerating everyone. South Africa believes in multiparty democracy, already that sets us against every regime, force and party that does not. South Africa believes in the rule of law and constitutional democracy, so every regime, force and party that does not, is an enemy.

It’s time to define South Africa, even if that means making a few enemies along the way. We stand up for what we believe, we fight for what we believe and we are prepared to die for what we believe. This is essential if South Africa is to escape from the wishy-washy nonsense which hangs over heads. Factually none of those countries, in conflict, have a Mandela, so lording it over the locals will be easy.

Without compromising our principles, and without whoring out our sovereignty, we can simply fight for what we believe. The world is waiting for volunteer countries to participate. Disregard the naysayers with their ‘charity begins at home’ spiel. Disregard those who would have us be used by the highest bidder, and demand rather that our freedom of association, as a country, be respected.

I’m not going to profile any of the theatres of war, lest I do an injustice to those who go unmentioned, but just looking at the options, leaves one in no doubt of the potential success of such a venture. We have the resources, we have the technology, we have the labour – all we need is the political will to get involved. And please none of that ‘peacekeeper’ malarkey.

Tags: , ,

  • The Place of Sara Baartman at UCT
  • Pauw’s revelations and democracy
  • The truth about Nkandla
  • The fatal hermeneutic divide in South Africa